Colorism in Media

A few things I want you to consider, how does colorism affect men, in particular black men, in how they view black women based on the images they see in the media and how do you think black women view themselves. You dont have to address this here but extra credit if you do.

Please read two articles about Viola Davis in Hollywood and watch another short video about Colorism and post your comments. Next week we will talk about the Romantic vs. Sexual Deviant and watch the classic film, Claudine. Have a great weekend.

http://oneblackgirlmanywords.blogspot.com/2014/09/viola-davis-is-classically-beautiful.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/14/magazine/viola-davis.html?src=me

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32 thoughts on “Colorism in Media

  1. Colorism is such an issue but this is mainly an issue in the African American community. These two articles bring forth the issue of Viola Davis and her main role in the new show ” How to Get Away With Murder” on ABC. Viola herself feels like this is her chance to show the world that dark skin black women can do more than the stereotypical roles that they usually portray. She is challenging the media in her own way.

    Men on the other hand are being told what to like based on what is being shown in the media. When watching a television show, movie, or even a music video there are these light skinned women that are being shown as sexy. This is giving men the idea that this is how a women is supposed to look. A light skin women that is considered African American and they have to be skinny with a big booty.

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    • Rebecca you bring up some good points but I disagree with your initial statement that colorism is mainly an issue in the African American community. This is a common misconception but as stated in the video, colorism is prevalent and problematic in many cultures such as in India and all across Asia.

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  2. I’m glad there is a discussion developing regarding the post. I’m looking forward to what others have to say about how we see “colorism” in the media and how those images and sterotypes plays out in our homes with our families, in our community and in society. A few in class already talked about how they’ve seen it in the media and how they see it demonstrated in a number of Caribbean cultures. Lets keep the discussion going.

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  3. It’s really tough to digest the notion that European colonialism is as powerful today as it was 300 years ago. Unfortunately a lot of African- American people have been terribly affected by the ideas in which colonialism helped to promote. Social constructs such as pseudoscience, colorism and racism, helped classify what is elite and non-elite within our communities. As it relates to the question, these constructs have shaped what men perceive as beautiful and not beautiful. Black men in particular, are taught by their communities to view lighter-skinned women as beautiful and darker skinned women as ugly. One of the media mediums that black men learn this from is definitely the hip hop music videos that we heavily consumed between the ages of 8-15. I personally can attest to this because when I was younger I determined what I viewed as beautiful based on the “Tip-Drill” music video that I would watch on BET Uncut. To me the equivalent of beauty was a Hispanic or light skinned black woman with protruding buttocks. This view was supported by hundreds of other music videos that pushed a similar agenda. Although I was not psychologically aware that my ideal girlfriend was being shaped by this colorism model, I still pursued women that were of a lighter skinned tone. For me to think this was irony in itself because I’m very dark-skinned. This in itself should of changed my view of what beauty was but it didn’t. I don’t think I really realized how much colorism affected me personally until I seen my Jamaican female cousins’ bleach their skin with toothpaste and Coast “Cake Soap”. They would do this twice a day to create an “even” light tone. Before you knew it they were light as hell. Often they would mock women that didn’t bleach. This to me is where I think I first saw this notion of hierarchy within my own race. Both women and men alike adhere to the colorism rules within the black community. A lot of women, like my cousins, are trying to physically attain this essence of beauty even if it means cosmetically changing who they are. Men, like the younger me, are trying to be with women who exemplify media’s perception of beauty. Jay-Z, one of my all-time favorite rappers once said on a song “My gear is in and I’m in the in crowd, and all the WAVY LIGHT SKINNED girls is loving me now, MY SELF ESTEEM WENT THROUGH THE ROOF, man, I got my SWAG”. (This song is “December 4th” on the Black Album if anyone cares lol). This line proves how a lot of black men feel about being with lighter skinned women. In some black communities, being with lighter skinned women gives you a sense of social mobility. This notion was further explained in “The Autobiography of Malcolm X” by Malcolm X and Alex Haley. In the book he explains that black men would perm their hair and be with white or lighter skinned women to give off a sense of being socially elite.
    Viola Davis reminds me of the rapper or singer that is forced to constrict her identity to give the people what they want. The powers that be don’t want to see a great actress like Davis in a role that is multifaceted. It’s sad that she had to succumb to what mass media wanted. Personally I loved her in “Antwone Fisher” and “Prisoners”, but too often she played the same roles. This is an issue that not only affects black actresses but also black actors. From Denzel to Michael B. Jordan, we never get to see them in multifaceted roles. I like that Davis is coming into her own and being able to express all she has to offer in this show. Personally I would like to see her in an HBO or AMC drama because I think those channels allow you to grow into your roles and express different acting skills. Local television channels usually add too much to spice to their dramas and make the show to dramatic to the point where it is no longer believable. At her age, she is lucky to be able to redefine herself and I’m looking forward to seeing her perform in more roles.

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  4. Wow, you really took the time to think about this. As you can see colorism plays a significant role in how we view ourselves and how we select our partners/mates. I appreciate your use of music videos as examples but this issue goes way beyond hip hop and videos, even music, film and TV. Something to think about as we celebrate Columbus Day and the start of colonialism in this country, how do we move beyond colorism and racism and move towards a more holistic and healthly image of people of color and women.

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  5. I believe that Colorism is a prevalent issue within the African American community, yet it is not only seen within this race. Colorism as stated within the short clip is seen throughout the world, wherever there is an indigenous colored group, and personally I can say that within the Latino community it can be seen within diverse cultures and regions. This clip discusses the internalization that occurs within females to adopt a certain belief in how one should look and act. When this happens, women can be at fault for continuing as well as contributing to a notion involving oppression and male dominance. Yes, we live in a society that looks down upon females who do not fit the model of what is considered to be beautiful, yet a positive change cannot be made without women themselves not falling victim to a role that has been constructed by men.
    The article on Viola Davis expresses her personal hardships in which she faces obstacles yielding her career as well as the roles that are given to her. Viola is a clear example of a female that embraces her beauty as well as not allowing her physicial appearance to be a leading factor in her acting career. Something that caught my eye was when she spoke about vanity. She stated ” “Vanity destroys your work,” “That’s the one thing you have to let go of as an actor. I don’t care how sexy or beautiful any woman is. At the end of the day, she has to take her makeup off. At the end of the day, she’s more than just pretty.” This is a very powerful statement which supports everything I have previously said, women in society today are dependent in physical appearance, not only in acting but in every day life. The idea that such dependence becomes a priority can strain a females view of herself as well as other females.

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    • Great comments Karen. Colorism is a serious issue seen in various communities of color that was once and is still played out in media even today. Thank you for finding and posting a quote from the article. Ms. Davis’ quote gives an honest and realistic perspective on the harsh realities of colorism in the media from an actress’ point of view but also from a person who has to fight not to internalize the hate and prejudice she experiences on a day to day basis.

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  6. The fact that we live in a society where we come from a system in which we as women don’t necessarily question the change over not being that stereotypical in a sense of living in a society where we have been told that for the last couple of centuries that we are below and not worthy is sickening. The fact that we ourselves in our group of women don’t give ourselves that boost of being important and being whatever you might be, is something that is rather shocking and pretty disturbing. Not only as women but the men as well. I love Viola Davis, I think that she is a very good representation of these types of casting, and I have to say that it was a right move that Shonda Rhymes tries to break free and give examples to the young adult generation that such actress such as Viola Davis can be considered for roles like these, and I’m happy for that. It’s something that would take a lot of time and self reflection in our media, but also it’s something that would be impossible.

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    • I think some of your wording is a little confusing but I understand the point you were making. I agree that Viola Davis was not only a great choice to feature as a lead actress because she helps to challenge colorism in the media. But she is also a great choice because she is an amazing actress that brings so much depth to her performances. She works on so many different levels.

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  7. “Vanity destroys your work,” she said. “That’s the one thing you have to let go of as an actor. I don’t care how sexy or beautiful any woman is. At the end of the day, she has to take her makeup off. At the end of the day, she’s more than just pretty.” I was truly inspired by Viola words and I agree and believe in them so much. It’s important to not let your looks determine who you are as a person and it’s even more important to not let anyone base who you are off your looks. Unfortunately colorism makes many feel like they have to keep on their makeup and show off how beautiful and sexy they are. Media has always centered its attention on the lighter-skinned woman deeming them as more beautiful and seductive. They are called upon to deliver these roles and are even displayed in music videos. This affecting the minds of young black girls of all colors and young black men. For the light-skin girls like me at a young age believing that you have to have long hair and curvy body because that’s only what boys see and want. To get into relationships as a teenager to have boyfriends to compare you to video vixens and feeling like 5’2 and skinny body just wasn’t it. For the dark skin girls to go through and even harder time because young boys didn’t see the worth and beauty of luscious milk chocolate skin or the purity and glow in dark chocolate girls. I know some who struggle and wish to have long hair and lighter skin and told me I had it easy, little did they know I had my own issues with colorism. Dark skin girls get the short end of the stick and always have and colorist makes sure to keep that in place.
    In a way viola is putting out her own line of black and beautiful and natural and is putting it in the media face what true beauty is. I agree with her and how Hollywood wants a “bankable” white actor to bring in payroll but I feel like black actresses are just as bankable and not always the Halle berry kind (token light-skin actress). I would love to see black women in more leading roles and being parts of movies like Les Miserables Where they can show more than a role of a mammy, Jezebel or some black woman’s rights activist. Yes our black history is important but that’s not the only roles we know how to act in, we don’t have to keep repeating the history of slavery in film and civil rights. Viola Davis is tired of these roles that darker skin woman are called upon to play. She is going against the grain every Thursday night to deliver steamy scenes and show that dark skin girls can be sexy and mysterious and powerful. I personally feel like she does it phenomenally, because she is being who she is which is a powerful and beautiful black woman. She’s telling the media and black men who are stuck in the light is right mindset and showing black women of all ages if I can do it, you can do it too. It’s time to drop the light vs. dark skin fight. Start praising all skin colors.

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    • Epiphany, thank you for sharing your personal experience with Colorism. If this class does nothing, it should help all of us see how we internalize these stereotypes and beauty models. It continues to affect generation after generation to the point that it no longer becomes about the way mainstream media sees us but how we use these stereotypes against each other. I hope this dialogue has a lasting effect and that it influences the work you do and how we relate to each other from this moment on.

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  8. I think colorism skews how most people, regardless of race or gender, view black women. Within most media there is a hierarchy formed in their representation. Though black women in general struggle for the same kind of representation as white women, it is even more difficult for a dark-skinned black woman. As the blogspot post points out, Viola Davis is not considered “classically beautiful” solely because she is a dark-skinned black woman and not being beautiful is synonymous with not being “worthy”. Hence, because she is not “classically beautiful” and, therefore, not “worthy”, she is generally resigned to playing mammy-type characters. In fact, I just watched the film “Annabelle” (2014), in which Viola Davis – the only black member of the cast – literally sacrifices herself to save the lives of a young, white family. Colonialism has left the deeply rooted, widespread message that even if you can’t be white, it is best to appear as close to white as possible.

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    • Great observations Olivia! Considering Viola Davis’ talent and years of experience, I wonder if she would have reached her current success, if not more and sooner, if she looked more like Halle Berry. In addition, Meryl Streep has never been considered a classically beautiful woman but has been a successful actress because it’s acknowledged that she is a great actress, an example of the Beauty Model at play.

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  9. I loved the articles about Viola Davis! And I’ve always liked Viola Davis as an actress so when I found out that How to Get Away With Murder was gonna have her as the lead I was excited because I never see dark skinned women, especially older ones well into their 40s play leading roles in shows. The issue of colorism in the black community is prevalent in every media source today. From music videos to books and movies, there’s an obvious divide between how light skin women are perceived and how dark skin women are perceived. It effects men in their view of black women because even some dark skin men will openly admit that they don’t want a women as dark as them which I find really odd. It also affects black men in how they are viewed. One would argue that dark skin guys are “winning” and light skin guys aren’t “in style” anymore but I feel society and the larger black community does not believe those claims. Light skin guys are seen as more handsome and more desirable ESPECIALLY if they have light eyes or “good” hair (I don’t believe in good or bad hair in terms of texture or curl pattern). Dark skin guys on the other hand have to meet certain criteria to be considered whether it be nice smile, height, body type, etc and I feel dark skin guys are perceived by society as more threatening and dangerous. So I think colorism is an issue with black women AND men but it definitely affects the women more as darkness isn’t seen as feminine or pretty. Viola Davis is a beautiful women but the woman who claimed she isn’t “classically beautiful” is not the only one who thinks that way unfortunately because of how society’s Eurocentric standard of beauty has been ingrained in our minds.

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    • Chanell, I’m very glad you have an appreciation for Viola Davis as an actress. I’m also happy so many of you read and seemed to enjoy the article. I’m also glad to see you noted the affect Colorism has on men, especially Black men. Not just how they view women, but they experience discrimination as well based on their skin color. My hope that this role as a lead in a mainstream show will not only have an impact on women of color now but will trickle down to generations to come.

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  10. Although Colorism is prominent in the African American community, As i have stated in class, this issue is also prominent in the Dominican Republic. My mother and grandmother are a lot darker than I am therefore they are usually referred to as “morena” which means “dark-skinned” in spanish. I, on the other hand am a lot lighter than they are and I am referred to as “blanquita” which means light-skinned. This is usually why I get surprised faces when I tell people that they are my mother and grandmother. Whenever I go to visit my family in D.R, I recall being looked at in amazement by many of my darker-skinned cousins and I was always complemented on my hair and fair skin. It isn’t a surprise to see more dark-skinned beggars on the streets than there are light-skinned beggars. On Dominican TV shows 99% of the time, the female TV hosts and sometimes even the news reporters are all light-skinned with long hair and voluptuous bodies. Light-skinned adolescents “hookup” with older men and these men provide them with money in order to get plastic surgery to enhance their bodies, hence leading them to get roles in music videos, movies, and TV shows. Dark-skinned women on the other hand are sometimes seen as “dirty” and are associated with Haitians (many Dominicans are not fond of Haitians). Now, this may not be the case for all light-skinned females out there, but it is a socially constructed stereotype that becomes more and more believable each day.
    I related Viola Davis’ story to my personal experiences because they are so similar in many ways. Colorism is, unfortunately, an issue in societies from all over the world and it affects men in that it leads them to believe that the right way to go would be with light-skinned females. I’ve heard stories of many men who have gotten with dark-skinned females and they often try to refrain from talking about it with their friends from fear of being teased. Boys growing up especially in this generation watch music videos and TV shows and eventually the idea that light-skinned girls are better than dark-skinned girls becomes engraved in their heads.

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  11. Stephanie, thank you as well for relating the issue of Colorism to your personal experience. It gives a great deal of context to the discussion. In addition, it continues to demonstrate how deep rooted Colorism is from media form to culture to family.

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  12. I hate to say this but the world is stereotypically painted as black to evil and white to be good. Hence, the idea of black to be evil and white to be good has evolved to colorism. I did not know that such things like colorism exist. I know of racism, feminism and other isms but colorism was very new to me until the last class. I believe, media and films can be consider as a source of this stereotype. As a result, it has affected black women psychologically or to some extent physically in search for brighter skin in order to be consider as “classically beautiful.” On the other hand colorism has affected not only black women but as well as has affected men to choose light skin female. This expectation of the whole stereotypical world can be seen living up to downgrade the inner beauty and talent of black female actresses in movies. So forth which has failed black female actresses to be in major roles and are assigned in minor roles or dark roles that perpetuates more stereotypes.

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    • Good comments, Sanam! Colorism exist in many communities and cultures around the world. It may even exist within and around your community but you may not know because it doesnt affect you directly.

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  13. I think Colorism has a big affect on black men in the way they view black woman. In todays society most films we see that the women with the “lighter” skin is the women to be with. They always portray light skin females as sexual deviants or irresistible while dark skin women are portrayed to be on the rougher side. I’ve even heard phrases amongst my piers such as “light skin is the right skin”. I think its really sad that we separate ourselves and put each other in different classes as black people because no matter what we are all black. But Colorism not only affects men but it affects our black females as well. When I go on social networks I always see different girls who feel that they are more superior to girls of a darker skin color because they are “lighter”. This also affects the girls who are darker because these stereotypes makes them feel that they are not beautiful to society and can cause self loathing. Overall I wish Colorism didn’t exist because I feel that as a black person we are all beautiful people no matter the shade of our skin.

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    • Curtis, you made some good interesting comments on how you see Colorism affect the African American community. I wondering what ways you feel we, as a community, can address this issue especially in the media that we produce.

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  14. It is all about fair skin. I think black artist in media incorporate the stereotypes made about black women. Typically the darker ones are more hypersexual as far as their body and as we have read in the text that makes them non-feminine. Then as said in the video, they are portrayed on screen as more masculine. They are given stronger aggressive and often the sapphire personality. That brings Viola Davis to mind. I saw Antoine fisher and did not even know that woman was her until i watched it for the first time in years last summer. The first time i really analyzed Davis was in Madea goes to jail the movie. What i noticed was a dark-skinned woman who was not made to look attractive but was supposed ot be a strong influence who helped set things right and set people straight. Her characters always had those traits. Then when i see her in How to get away with Murder she is more of a superwoman and her character has sex appeal. From the cloths to being promiscuous. In a recent paper i wrote i had to be a media critic and analyze a magazine. In my paper i have a segment on Davis based on the magazine having a quote next to a picture of her that says, “My booty is on the line” in regards to her new hit role. My question is why does the word booty of to be used and why is the magazine exploiting that. On the show one thing that is clearly noticeable is a her “booty”. It is such irony that i find quote like that in a magazine where for first time Davis has a character who has some sex appeal.

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    • Chris, I don’t think darker women are sexualized more than lighter skin black women but it depends on the film. In some music videos and movies, lighter skinned black women are more stereotyped. Obviously, darker skinned women are stereotyped in different ways. Viola Davis is a perfect example of that. Fortunately, she is moving out of being typedcast with her new ABC show, it will be interesting to see if a tv audience can embrace a brown skinned being anything other than a housekeeper or servant.

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  15. Colorism is a sad construct to me because it is exactly what we bash white for. It is simply discrimination or hatred of another because of the shade or color of their skin. It makes me sad that we as black people find so many ways to hate each other. Its really sickening especially now how younger people play with the light skin verses dark skin situation as if we don’t have enough problems being respected as a race by other races. I partly blame media but I blame my people more because we should see the whats going on as far as media play and we should work to destroy it or ignore it altogether. Its like we just tune and become victim to what ever is being put out and then live our lives according to what we are told or shown. White people control the media in case it has been forgotten. It to me is a smaller version of racism that is working in the grand scheme of racism and this all through brainwashing. Black men unconsciously are taught now to hate our own women because of how they are perceived to act. And this perception is played everywhere from movies television shows to comedian stand up topics to characters in books to cartoons. Black women feed into this subconsciously as well and thus creates confusion and frustration. Its like they know they don’t have to act like that but for some reason they feel they have to because any other way of acting wouldn’t be considered black, and I’m referring to certain mannerisms and mindsets that have been adopted.

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    • Darell, I think it’s easy to blame black people for their internalized racism but it’s not that easy. There have been generations of people who have internalized the messaging. Media literacy and education helps but it’s only the tip of the iceberg, we also need more media makers who challenge the stereotypes and create healthier male and female characters of color.

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  16. As we know colorism is and will always continue to be a prominent factor of our social lives. To be clear, though colorism is heavily associated with African American decent, the issue is not subjected to this one race. In relation to the short clip, women are internalizing this one idea of how the typical black women should act and sound. For me personally, I do not believe that the foundation of positive, strong, ethical, level headed black women was displayed in this clip—nonetheless in majority of media settings today. What we see these days in media is black women struggling to portray this image of “true beauty” when in reality true beauty lies within an individual.
    The article with Viola Davis is the epitome of this. It is mentioned in the article that Viola Davis’ career is often skeptical in terms of what roles she accept/the roles that are given to her. In her new show “How to get away with Murder” she is stepping outside of her normal framework. Simple to us, but extremely difficult for Viola Davis to do successfully. Where we just see a great actress who is great at all of the roles she does indeed play, what we don’t see are the measures of which she must restrain/withdraw from who she actually is as an individual in order to make a living. In this new sitcom, Viola Davis will be stepping away from the social norms that media is set to display. Viola Davis also mentions that Hollywood just wants a “bankable” white actor. Luckily for her, she is granted the opportunity to try and have these “norms” configured into the reality that black women can stray away from what they have always been seen as. They do not always have to be represented as the Jezebel, whore, and or sexual deviants; instead we will take measures and accept the challenges given to us when initiating a change in the way black women are displayed in film.

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  17. Many would agree that our notion of beauty is predominantly influenced by the media. People are constantly bombarded with images of women that represent idealized beauty in our society. Evidently, frequent exposure to these images will significantly impact women’s perception of themselves and of others. By simple observation, we can assert that mainstream media often portrays beautiful women as light-skinned, whereas women of a darker complexion are rarely given the spotlight. As we have discussed in class, dark-skinned African American women are commonly depicted as hyper-sexual, unfeminine, and unattractive beings. Consequently, light-skinned and dark-skinned women placed on complete opposite sides of the spectrum with regard to beauty and sexuality in the media has indubitably contributed to the feud between them, and ostensibly plays a major role in the perpetuation of colorism in the African American community. I, myself, have witnessed colorism between African Americans on social media who post “light-skin vs. dark-skin” photos. In essence, this places them in competition with one another, rather than recognizing the larger picture that is colorism, and fighting against it. I think it is extremely unfortunate that the media teaches young African American women that their beauty is defined by their complexion, instead of teaching them to love and embrace the skin their in. Viola Davis, though I do not possess much knowledge about her work, is one to be highly regarded with respect considering her constant efforts to strive for success as a dark-skinned African American actress despite the media’s lack of appreciation for her talent by not giving her major, lead roles in film/tv shows. I think it is important to acknowledge that Davis always put her all into her work regardless of what role was given to her. Furthermore, she emphasized that beauty should be skin deep because at the end of the day women are “more than just a pretty face.” Fortunately, her work paid off when she finally landed a protagonist role in the new show “How To Get Away With Murder” in which she received the opportunity to play a character outside of her usual role, and show forth her full capability as an actress.

    Although colorism is prominent in the African American community, I am fully aware that this issue exists within many other races/cultures. My mother is from the Philippines, where majority of the people have a very tan complexion. Similar to the notion of light-skinned as more beautiful, many Filipino women yearn to have a lighter complexion. In fact, famous celebrities usually pay large sums of money to have their skin lightened to be considered beautiful in the eyes of the public. Those who are part of tribal communities are darker than average Filipinos, and are often considered as extremely unattractive. Thus, I believe it is important for people to shed light on colorism considering its prevalence across the world.

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  18. Rebecca Connie stated “With men is to attain sex and Women is to be that object”. That’s what the Media does to Women and Men. Media portrays what is “Acceptable and what is not among features necessary to appeal. Example when rappers started to refer to their women as a “Bitch”. Talking to a guy he would say stuff like “I’m chilling with my bitch”. The media set all sorts of new trends for our generation and it’s a disgrace. I hear this all the time “Your pretty for a black girl “ Am I supposed to smile and say thank you ? Heck NO! Why? Because black isn’t associated with beauty ! Have you ever seen #TeamDarkSkin v #TeamLightSkin? Media has turned our own “kind” against one another. What about when Barack Obama became President, did you hear our ignorant brothers and sisters say the only reason why he was chosen is because he’s Bi-racial! NOT even our own kind would believe a BLACK decent could achieve something attainable. (It’s sad) This topic can go on especially with me because one I’m black. Two, growing up learning about African American History and how much our ancestors fought, died, lynched, and look where we are today. Discriminating against our own kind! I don’t watch shows like the Bad girls club, Love and Hip-hop ect . Why would I laugh at people fighting? Why would I entertain BLACK couples cheating on each other and invading women’s privacy?
    I don’t find that entertaining at ALL !
    As for Viola David, I salute her because it’s about time she stood up and said you know what, I’m better than what society is interested in. Why should she keep playing in the same roles to be relevant? Although I don’t watch her show I’m happy for leading role in “How to Get Away with Murder”! I’m tired of media betraying BLACK women, Stand up and take pride because BLACK is beautiful.

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  19. With the fact that colorism exists it proves to be a difficult task for someone of a darker skin to be idolized in some way. When you look at Viola Davis at first glance some will say she is an angry black woman because of her appearence which is to be a strong but intimidating character. This proves a flaw for the idea that many people see this as why her? Why not use this person instead? The reason being is the idea of the media playing a much bigger part in the influence on what people think. Let us take an example of what the idea of classic beauty. Classic beauty is a term that is only defined in the time frame or time period itself as an example in colonial times we see classic as a lady one who dresses as royalty with make up and a fan. Then we see the idea of classic beauty as the skinny or coke bottle shape but only white females we seen as classic beauty. Could it be that now since black celeberties aer coming up they have to show some form of sexual or non-woman act to be recognized by media? I believe that this thought process is unfair to the viewer because a black woman can be powerful and also still show a form of beauty in her own way. I agree with Shavonn because what entertainment is black women fighting with each other it just falls under the control media and white hierarchy has to show that the black color are animals. This i believe is wrong because those that are seen as animals or do not define classic beauty have their own persona to show their own beauty. White women can do the same role as a black woman but are seen as different view points. A white homewrecker can be seen as the persistent love pursuer but pass the role to a black actress she is seen as the hoe or jezebel. Colorism keeps the viewers from actually seeing the meaning of the role or the importance just because of the color of their skin. I say the color of skin keeps those not educated in this problem in the loop of follow the media and they give the real truth when we all know in fact this is not true.

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  20. Colorism tells Black Men that only a certain shade of Black Women are worthy. As the worth of a woman is tied into how appealing she is to men, since darker Black women are constantly deemed unattractive in comparison to the lighter skinned, Black men internalize this notion. The praise lighter women while degrading darker women. The media just re-enforces and confirms colorism by showing lighter women in flattering images. Through music videos and lyrics in particular, the artist are surrounded by light skin women to imply that these features are what are desirable because if this success man wants and has these women, as a Black man, you have to strive for this. Because society ties a woman’s worth to her body and attractiveness to men, when colorism tells women that they must be lighter to be attractive, women begin to believe that they are not worthy of anything. That they must take what is given to them. This causes division amoung women in the Black community. This is how the “Team Light Skin” vs “Team Dark Skin” came about. Under colorism, Black women are fighting each other to prove their worth to males who only attribute worth to a certain shade because of the images fed to them.

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